Bungor

INTRODUCTION

The common Malaysian name for the timber of Lagerstroemia spp. (Lythraceae). Vernacular name applied appears to be rather uniform in that bungor is used throughout the country. Major species include L. floribunda, L. ovalifolia and L. speciosa. The sapwood is light yellow-brown to grey-white, sometimes with a pink tinge, merging gradually into the heartwood, which is pale red-brown and darkens on exposure.

Also known as Banglang and Sralao (Cambodia); Benteak, Jarul, Lendi and Pyinma (India); Bungur, Langoti and Oindoloe (Indonesia); Khi mu, Mai ka ka lao tia, Mai peuay dam, Peuay khok and Peuay si da (Laos); Pyinma (Myanmar); Jarul (Pakistan); Banaba (Philippines); Banlang, Intanin, Salao, Tabeak and Tabek (Thailand); and Banglang and Banlang (Vietnam).


DENSITY

The timber is moderately hard and moderately heavy with a density of 515-785 kg/m3 air dry.


NATURAL DURABILITY

The timber is moderately durable.


PRESERVATIVE TREATMENT

It is very difficult to treat with preservatives.


TEXTURE

Texture is moderately fine to rather coarse but uneven due to the ring-porous nature of the wood. Grain is straight or slightly interlocked, occasionally conspicuously wavy.


STRENGTH PROPERTIES

The timber falls into Strength Group B (Burgess, 1958).


MACHINING PROPERTIES

It is reported to saw and work well and produces a smooth finish. However, it is very difficult to peel even after boiling for 48 hours.


AIR DRYING

The timber is reputed to season well with very little degrade.


SHRINKAGE

Shrinkage is reported to be high, with radial shrinkage averaging 1.9% and tangential shrinkage averaging 4%.


USES

The timber is one of the rare Malaysian timbers to have a ring-porous arrangement and thus produces a pleasing growth-ring figure. The timber is suitable for interior finishing, panelling, mouldings, furniture, plywood and decking.


REFERENCES

  1. Burgess, H. J. 1958. Strength Grouping of Malaysian Timbers. Malayan Forest Service Trade Leaflet No.25. The Malaysian Timber Industry Board and Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 15 pp.
  2. Wong, T. M. 1982. A Dictionary of Malaysian Timbers. Revised by Lim, S. C. & Chung, R. C. K. Malayan Forest Record No. 30. Forest Research Institute Malaysia Kuala Lumpur. 201 pp.