Ludai

INTRODUCTION

The Standard Malaysian Name as well as the ASEAN Standard Name for the timber of Sapium spp. (Euphorbiaceae). Vernacular names applied include gurah (Peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak) and mamah pelandok (Peninsular Malaysia). Only two species are commonly found in the country, viz. S. baccatum and S. discolor. The sapwood is not differentiated from the heartwood, which is light yellow-brown, sometimes with a pink tinge.

Also known as Seleng (India); Morowoelande and Morsee (Indonesia); Lelun (Myanmar); Balakat gubat (Philippines); and Tilla (Sri Lanka).


DENSITY

The timber is soft and light with a density of 290-465 kg/m3 air dry.


NATURAL DURABILITY

The timber is non-durable under exposed conditions.


PRESERVATIVE TREATMENT

The timber can be treated with preservatives easily.


TEXTURE

Texture is moderately coarse but even, with straight or deeply interlocked and sometimes wavy grain.


STRENGTH PROPERTIES

The timber falls into Strength Group D (Burgess, 1958).


MACHINING PROPERTIES

It is easy to saw and works well with all tools. The planed surface is smooth.


AIR DRYING

The timber seasons fairly rapidly with some insect attacks and some staining by fungi. 13 mm thick boards take 2 months to air dry, while 38 mm thick boards take 3 months.


SHRINKAGE

Shrinkage is very low, with radial shrinkage averages 0.8% while tangential shrinkage averages 1.8%.


USES

The timber is suitable for plywood as well as packing boxes and crates. The timber is most likely to be suitable for pulp and paper manufacture.


REFERENCES

  1. Burgess, H. J. 1958. Strength Grouping of Malaysian Timbers. Malayan Forest Service Trade Leaflet No.25. The Malaysian Timber Industry Board and Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 15 pp.
  2. Wong, T. M. 1982. A Dictionary of Malaysian Timbers. Revised by Lim, S. C. & Chung, R. C. K. Malayan Forest Record No. 30. Forest Research Institute Malaysia Kuala Lumpur. 201 pp.