Putat

INTRODUCTION

The Standard Malaysian Name as well as the ASEAN Standard Name for the timber of Barringtonia spp. (Lecythidaceae). Other vernacular names include tampalang (Sabah). Major species include B. asiatica, B. macrostachya, B. pendula, B. sarcostachys and B. scortechinii. The sapwood is light yellow-brown and is not differentiated from the heartwood.

Also known as Hijal (India); Butun, Keben and Songgom (Indonesia); Chicknam, Kyi-bin and Kyi-gyi (Myanmar); Botong and Ulam (Philippines); and Chik (Thailand).


DENSITY

The timber is moderately hard to hard and moderately heavy to heavy with a density of 480-815 kg/m3 air dry.


NATURAL DURABILITY

The timber is non-durable under exposed conditions.


TEXTURE

Texture is moderately fine and even, with straight to interlocked grain.


STRENGTH PROPERTIES

The timber falls into Strength Group B (Burgess, 1958).


MACHINING PROPERTIES

It is easy to resaw and easy to fairly easy to cross-cut. Planing is easy and the planed surface produced is smooth to moderately smooth.


AIR DRYING

The timber seasons fairly slowly, without any degrade except for slight insect and fungal attacks. 13 mm thick boards take approximately 2 months to air dry while 38 mm thick boards take 5 months.


SHRINKAGE

Shrinkage is rather high, with radial shrinkage averaging 1.9% and tangential shrinkage averaging 3.1%.


USES

The timber is suitable for temporary construction, non-striking tool handles, general planking, packing boxes and crates, plywood and pallets.


REFERENCES

  1. Burgess, H. J. 1958. Strength Grouping of Malaysian Timbers. Malayan Forest Service Trade Leaflet No. 25. The Malaysian Timber Industry Board and Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 15 pp.
  2. Wong, T. M. 1982. A Dictionary of Malaysian Timbers. Revised by Lim, S. C. & Chung, R. C. K. Malayan Forest Records No. 30. Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 201 pp.