Dungun

INTRODUCTION

The Standard Malaysian Name as well as the ASEAN Standard Name for the timber of Heritiera littoralis (Sterculiaceae). Other vernacular names applied include dungun laut (Sabah). The sapwood is pale brown or pink-brown and merges gradually into the heartwood, which is red-brown, purplish brown to dark brown.

Also known as Kendraivinaya-lewak-alou and Rosorosa (Fiji); Dungon (Indonesia); Kanazo and Pinle-kanazo (Myanmar); Dungon and Dungon late (Philippines); and Du Hun and Ngonkai-thale (Thailand).


DENSITY

The timber is hard and heavy to very heavy with a density of 785-1,170 kg/m3 air dry.


NATURAL DURABILITY

The timber is moderately durable.


TEXTURE

Texture is moderately fine and even, with interlocked or irregular grain.


STRENGTH PROPERTIES

The timber falls into Strength Group B (Burgess, 1958).


MACHINING PROPERTIES

It is reported to be difficult to saw and work but the finish is smooth.


AIR DRYING

The timber is difficult to season, with end-splitting and surface-checking as the major defects.


SHRINKAGE

Shrinkage is high, especially in the tangential direction. Radial shrinkage averages 2% while tangential shrinkage averages 4.5%. 


USES

The timber is suitable for heavy and medium construction, piling, posts, boat building, tool handles (impact), flooring (heavy traffic) and staircase (carriage, newel, riser, stringer, tread, bullnose, round end and winder).


REFERENCES

  1. Burgess, H.J. 1958. Strength Grouping of Malaysian Timbers. Malayan Forest Service Trade Leaflet No. 25. The Malaysian Timber Industry Board and Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 15 pp.
  2. Menon, P.K.B. 1986. Uses of Some Malaysian Timbers. Revised by Lim, S.C. Timber Trade Leaflet No. 31. The Malaysian Timber Industry Board and Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 48 pp.
  3. Wong T.M. 1982. A Dictionary of Malaysian Timbers. Revised by Lim S.C. & Chung R.C.K. Malayan Forest Records No. 30. Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 201 pp.