Limpaga

INTRODUCTION

The Standard Malaysian Name, which is of Sabah origin, for the timber of Toona spp. (Meliaceae). Vernacular names applied include kalantas (Sabah), ranggau (Sabah), surian (Peninsular Malaysia) with various epithets and tangisan burong (Peninsular Malaysia). The name limpaga is often applied to more than one genus from the family Meliaceae in Sabah. Major species include Toona sinensis and T. sureni. The sapwood is grey-white or pink and is sharply differentiated from the heartwood, which is light red or red-brown.

Also known as Red cedar (Australia); Chomcha (Cambodia); Hill Toon and Toon (India); Suren and Surian (Indonesia); Mai nyom hom (Laos); Thikado and Toon (Myanmar); Toon (Pakistan); Red cedar (Papua New Guinea); Kalantas (Philippines); and Moulmein cedar, Toon and Yom-Hom (Thailand).


DENSITY

The timber is soft and light with a density of 270-530 kg/m3 air dry.


NATURAL DURABILITY

The timber is non-durable.


TEXTURE

Texture is moderately coarse and uneven due to the ring-porous nature of the wood. The grain is interlocked or wavy.


STRENGTH PROPERTIES

The timber falls into Strength Group D (Burgess, 1958).


MACHINING PROPERTIES

It is easy to resaw and cross-cut. Planing is easy and the planed surface is smooth.


AIR DRYING

The timber seasons fairly rapidly without any degrade except for some light warping. 25 mm thick boards take approximately 3.5 months to air dry.


KILN-DRYING

Kiln Schedule J is recommended. The timber dries fast without any degrade. 25 mm thick boards kiln-dry from 50 to 10% moisture content in 6 days.


Kiln Schedule J

Moisture Content (%)

Temperature (Dry Bulb)

Temperature (Wet Bulb)

Relative Humidity (%)  (approx.)

F

C

F

C

Green

135

57.0

123

50.5

70

50

135

57.0

119

48.0

60

40

140

60.0

118

47.5

50

30

150

65.5

121

49.0

40

20

170

76.5

127

53.0

30


SHRINKAGE

Shrinkage is moderate, with radial shrinkage averaging 1.1% and tangential shrinkage averaging 2.7%.


USES

This timber is equivalent to the red cedar of Australia and the Spanish cedar. It is highly prized as a high-class cabinet wood and also suitable for interior finishing, panelling, mouldings, furniture, joinery, plywood, cigar boxes, ornamental items and other decorative purposes.


REFERENCES

  1. Burgess, H. J. 1958. Strength Grouping of Malaysian Timbers. Malayan Forest Service Trade Leaflet No. 25. The Malaysian Timber Industry Board and Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 15 pp.
  2. Menon, P. K. B. 1986. Uses of Some Malaysian Timbers. Revised by Lim, S. C. Timber Trade Leaflet No. 31. The Malaysian Timber Industry Board and Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 48 pp.
  3. Wong, T. M. 1982. A Dictionary of Malaysian Timbers. Revised by Lim, S. C. & Chung, R. C. K. Malayan Forest Records No. 30. Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. 201 pp.